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US Government is moving back into the Cheyenne Mountain Complex


The United States’ airspace defense military is planning to move its communications equipment back to its iconic nuclear Cold War-era bunker which was abandoned nearly a decade ago, the head of the agency announced.

Cheyenne Mountain Blast Door Entrance

Cheyenne Mountain Blast Door Entrance

The Cheyenne Mountain bunker in Colorado Springs, which was the filming location for the popular Stargate SG-1 science fiction TV series, was first built in 1965 to resist a Soviet nuclear attack.

The site was abandoned in 2006 due to heavy costs, and since then the complex has been merely on “warm standby,” meaning it is only staffed when required.

The Cheyenne Mountain Complex is one of the icons of the Cold War – a self-contained and sufficient town buried under the Rockies meant to be impervious to a Soviet nuclear barrage.

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It was home to the North American Aerospace Command (NORAD), scanning the skies for hostile missiles and the military command and control center of the United States in the event of World War Three.

It shut down nearly ten years ago as the threat from Russia seemed to subside, but this week the Pentagon announced that Cheyenne Mountain will once again be home to the most advanced tracking and communications equipment in the United States military.

The shift to the Cheyenne Mountain base in Colorado is designed to safeguard the command’s sensitive sensors and servers from a potential electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack, military officers said.

The Pentagon last week announced a $700 million contract with Raytheon Corporation to oversee the work for North American Aerospace Command (NORAD) and US Northern Command.

Admiral William Gortney, head of NORAD and Northern Command, said that ‘because of the very nature of the way that Cheyenne Mountain’s built, it’s EMP-hardened.’


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